The Most Competitive Business Schools to Get Into

As business school becomes more popular for domestic and international students, the number of applications submitted to U.S. MBA programs continues to increase. Due to the increase in applicants, acceptance rates have dropped because the number of open spots at these schools remain the same. Find out which schools have the lowest acceptance rates, making them the most competitive business schools in the United States. Are any of these on your dream school list?
 

Ranking School Acceptance Rate Average GMAT
1 Stanford University 6.1% 733
2 Harvard University 10.7% 725
3 University of California — Berkeley (Haas) 13% 715
4 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan) 14.6% 716
5 University of Florida (Hough) 15.8% 681
6 Penn State University — University Park (Smeal) 17.1% 636
7 University of California — Davis 17.8% 683
8 Columbia University 18% 715
9 University of California — Los Angeles (Anderson) 19.8% 713
10 University of Pennsylvania (Wharton) 19.8% 732

 
Don’t have the GMAT score you need? Try the Ready4 GMAT app to improve your score today!

4 Ways to Prepare for Your Business School Interview

If you’re reading this article, you’ve probably already submitted your b-school applications and received interview offers. Congratulations! You’ve passed the first, and most difficult, stage of the business school application process. Making it to the interview stage means the school is interested in learning more about you because they believe you are potentially a good fit for the program. So give yourself a pat on the back and follow these tips to present your best self during your interview.
 

1. Know Thyself

 
It’s important to present yourself in an authentic manner because it demonstrates that you are self-aware and understand your personal strengths and weaknesses. Nobody is perfect, so you shouldn’t act as if you are during your interview. Of course, this doesn’t mean you should play down your real accomplishments. Talk about your accomplishments in a way that proves to the interviewer that you are extremely competent and have potential (because you really do!).

The end goal is to convince the admissions committee that they want you to represent the school after you graduate and move on to do even greater things. After the interview, they should feel as if they need to accept you because you would contribute a lot to their name and their program. Explaining how the MBA program can help you achieve your personal goals in an authentic manner is key to acing the MBA interview.
 

2. Practice Makes Perfect

 
You should never go into an interview unprepared. Cover the basics: make a list of questions they’re likely to ask and formulate a response to each question. Practice saying your answers out loud so you’re not struggling to put together sentences during the real interview. Get a friend to role play as the interviewer and ask for their feedback on your performance. Be sure to have a few stories in mind to use when you need to explain your passion for a certain industry or decision to attend business school. These stories should sound authentic, not forced, which is something a trusted friend can point out to you.
 

3. Familiarize Yourself with the MBA Program

 
During your preparation, you should be cognizant of making your responses relevant to the school and their program. One-size-fits-all answers will not impress admissions committees and can hurt your chances of acceptance. Be sure to read any information about the MBA program carefully so you can bring up key features of the school’s program during the interview. Not only will it help you provide strong responses, but you’ll also remind yourself why you applied to those schools in the first place. Revisiting your application essay can help you construct a thoughtful, compelling response to the question “Why do you want to attend this school?”
 

4. Dress to Impress

 
A business school interview is a formal interview and you need to dress the part. First impressions are critical and wearing a suit indicates you are serious about your decision to get an MBA degree. So whether or not you wear suits on a daily basis, you need to go get it dry cleaned so it’s fresh and not wrinkled during one of the most important interviews of your life.
 
 
Hopefully these 4 tips help you better prepare for your business school interview. If you’re interested in reading more b-school admissions advice, be sure to follow our Facebook page and Twitter account!

Top Engineering Graduate Programs and Average GRE Quant Scores 2017

According to the Council of Graduate Schools, engineering is the most popular field of study by quantity of applications (321,521 in Fall 2015). If you’re thinking of applying to a top engineering graduate program, you’ll want to have an idea about the GRE score range for the best schools in the U.S. We’ve got information about the top engineering programs and their average GRE Quant scores for 2017 from U.S. News & World Report:
 

Ranking School Average GRE Quantitative Score
1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167
2 Stanford University 167
3 University of California–Berkeley 166
4 California Institute of Technology 168
5 Carnegie Mellon University 165
6 University of Michigan–Ann Arbor 166
7 (tie) Georgia Institute of Technology 164
7 (tie) University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign/td>

165
9 Purdue University–West Lafayette 164
10 University of Texas–Austin (Cockrell) 165

 
Although U.S. News & World Report does not provide average GRE Verbal score data, we recommend that you aim for a score range of 155 – 160 for the schools on this list. Of course, having the perfect GRE score doesn’t guarantee admission to any graduate program, but it helps if your score falls within the average range.

Don’t have the GRE Scores you need? Try the free Ready4 GRE app to improve your score today!

When Should You Start Studying for the GMAT?

Whether you’re 100% sure you want to go to business school or completely on the fence about it, the GMAT is an important test that you need to factor into your decision to get an MBA. Planning when to study for the GMAT depends on many things, including the timing of your application and your list of target schools. The good thing is that your GMAT score is valid for 5 years, so as long as you plan to apply to business school within that time period, and you’re happy with your score, you don’t need to worry about retaking the exam.

Here are 3 things you should consider in order to decide when to start studying for the GMAT:
 

1. Your Target GMAT Score

 
Before you begin studying for the GMAT, you need to have a goal score. For this part, you need to research your target schools and check the average GMAT score of students accepted into the programs of your choice. Using that information, you can then create your goal score.

We’ve talked in-depth about SMART goals before, but for those of you who need a quick refresher, SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Adjustable, Realistic, and Time-based. A  goal that sounds something like “I want to get a high score” is not a SMART goal!

Let’s look at an example of an excellent SMART goal:

“I want to increase my GMAT score from 600 to 650 after 8 weeks of studying 1 hour each day.”

It states a specific goal (GMAT score of 650), with measurable numbers that are realistic and time-based (8 weeks of studying 1 hour each day). It’s important to keep your goal adjustable when unexpected situations arise and your study schedule is interrupted. This means you may have to lower your score expectations or postpone the day you take your test. Keeping your goal adjustable and realistic will prevent you from burning out and giving up on your studies. Once you have a SMART goal and a detailed way to measure your progress, you’ll be able to determine what areas you need to focus on in order to achieve your goal.
 

2. Average Amount of Study Time Needed

 
Now that you know the GMAT score you need to get into the programs that you want, you’ll have to determine how long you should study in order to reach your goal. The GMAC has a helpful chart that shows the average amount of time students studied to get scores ranging from less than 400 to 700 or higher.

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-11-32-11-am

If your goal is to score 700 or higher, you’ll need to study for about 121 hours. That would take almost 4 months if you studied for 1 hour each day. Studying 3 to 4 months before your scheduled test date is the minimum amount of time you should study if you want to get a decent GMAT score.

Of course, there’s no such thing as a magic number and studying for 121 hours doesn’t guarantee that your score will be above 700. Take into consideration your strengths and weaknesses when you estimate the amount of time you’ll need to study for the GMAT. In any case, don’t leave studying to the last minute–even 1 month before the exam is cutting it close!
 

3. Extra Time for Retaking the GMAT

 
Nobody ever wants to retake the GMAT, but you may want to leave enough time for yourself to retake the GMAT if you’re not satisfied with your score. You will need to wait 16 days before you can take the test again, but you probably want to spend more than that amount of time focusing on improving your areas of weakness.

A quick way to improve your score is by using the Ready4 GMAT app, which features a diagnostic test to help you target your areas of weakness. You can also customize practice tests to be as long or as short as you’d like so you can study anytime, anywhere.

Regardless of how you study for the GMAT, if you keep in mind these three things, you should have enough time to be adequately prepared for the real GMAT exam. Good luck!

GMAT Question of the Week #6: Data Sufficiency

This data sufficiency problem consists of a question and two statements, labeled (1) and (2), in which certain data are given. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the question. Using the data given in the statements, plus your knowledge of mathematics and everyday facts (such as the number of days in July or the meaning of the word counterclockwise), you must indicate whether:

  • Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
  • Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
  • BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.
  • EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked.
  • Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are needed.


A cafeteria served hamburgers and hot dogs on a certain day. If the cost of each hamburger was $5 and the cost of each hot dog was $3, what was the total cost of the hamburgers and hot dogs served by the cafeteria that day?

(1) The total number of hamburgers and hot dogs served was 130.
(2) The ratio of the number of hamburgers to the number of hot dogs served was 3 to 2.

A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.
B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.
C) BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are not sufficient.

Click here for the answer and explanation.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explanation

Let x and y represent the number of hamburgers and hot dogs served in the cafeteria, respectively. We need to know if we can determine the total cost of the hamburgers and hot dogs given the hamburgers cost $5 each and the hot dogs cost $3 each.

(1) It is given that the total number of hamburgers and hot dogs served was 130. So, x+y=130. However, we don’t know the value of either x or y, so the total cost cannot be determined. 

Statement (1) alone is NOT sufficient. Eliminate Choices (A) and (D).

(2) It is given that the ratio of the number of hamburgers to the number of hot dogs served was 3 to 2. So, \tfrac{x}{y}=\tfrac{3}{2}. If x=30 and y=20, then \tfrac{x}{y}=\tfrac{3}{2} is true. But if x=60 and y=40, then \tfrac{x}{y}=\tfrac{3}{2} is also true. Since we don’t know the value of either x or y, the total cost cannot be determined. 

Statement (2) alone is NOT sufficient. Eliminate Choice (B), leaving Choices (C) and (E).

Combining the statements, we know x+y=130 and \tfrac{x}{y}=\tfrac{3}{2}, or equivalently, x=\tfrac{3}{2}y. We can substitute \tfrac{3}{2}y for x into x+y=130 and get the value of y. We can then use that to get the value of x and the total cost can be determined.  Both statements together are sufficient.

The answer is Choice (C).

What You Need to Know About the PSAT

Every fall, over three million students take the PSAT/NMSQT. Students qualify for the National Merit Scholarship during their junior year, but are also eligible to sit for a practice PSAT as sophomores. Is this test included in the college application process? No. Does this test help you practice for the SAT? Yes. How will my PSAT score impact my future? Don’t worry, we’ll get to that question, but first we need to answer the basics.

What is the PSAT/NMSQT?

PSAT stands for Preliminary SAT and NMSQT stands for National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. The format of the test is very similar to the SAT, except that it is shorter and the math sections don’t include third-year level problems. Taking the PSAT during your junior year can qualify you for the National Merit Scholarship. Every year, approximately 7,500 students who score in the top 99th percentile in their state receive $2,500 or more in scholarship money toward college tuition.

Qualifying for the National Merit Scholarship is an excellent achievement that looks great on college applications, and can qualify you for other scholarship opportunities. For those of you who are on the fence about taking the PSAT, you should consider taking the test for the chance to win scholarship money and practice for the real SAT.

What to Expect

The PSAT is 2 hours and 45 minutes long with three sections: Evidence-Based Reading, Writing & Language, and Math. The Evidence-Based Reading section contains 5 passages and 47 questions, with 60 minutes to complete this section. The Writing & Language section covers 45 questions and lasts for 35 minutes. The Math section is 70 minutes long and contains 47 questions. For the first 25 minutes of the Math section, you are not allowed to use a calculator to answer the questions. You are allowed to use a calculator for the remaining 45 minutes of the section.

Here’s a table that lays out the PSAT sections more clearly:

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-11-32-11-am

Your PSAT Score

When you finish taking the PSAT, you’ll receive a score report online in December and on paper in January. Your PSAT score will fall between 320 to 1520. This range of scores is 80 points lower than the SAT score range (400 to 1600) because the PSAT is easier in comparison to the SAT. Your score report will contain information about your percentile (how well you did in comparison to everyone else who took the test) and your National Merit Selection Index (a number between 48-228 that determines whether or not you are eligible for National Merit recognition). This information will give you an idea about how you’ll perform on the SAT and how you compare to your peers.

Should You Take the PSAT?

Taking the PSAT is as close as you’ll get to the experience of taking the real SAT because it takes place in a similar test environment and contains the same types of questions. It’s the best way to determine how you’ll perform on the SAT in comparison to your peers because over three million students take the test on the same day. Not only will you get information about how prepared you are for the SAT, but you’ll also be able to qualify for scholarships and National Merit recognition.

Here at Ready4, we’re confident you can do well on the PSAT, especially if you prepare with our free Ready4 PSAT app. Good luck on the PSAT!

GMAT Question of the Day: Presidential Debate Edition

As a participant in the second debate and, more importantly, as an emblem of American panache, Kenneth Bone has arguably become the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election, who has sparked discussion of a number of topics including environmental policy, domestic job security, and red quarter-zip sweaters.

A) Kenneth Bone has arguably become the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election, who has sparked discussion of a number of topics including

B) Kenneth Bone, arguably the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election, has sparked discussion of a number of topics that include

C) Kenneth Bone has arguably become the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election, sparking discussion of a number of topics including

D) arguably the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election is Kenneth Bone, who has sparked discussion of a number of topics including

E) arguably the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election, Kenneth Bone, has sparked discussion of a number of topics including

Click here for the answer and explanation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explanation

This is a question about modifiers—phrases that describe nouns. There are a few modifiers in this sentence; one is the section before Kenneth Bone is mentioned: “As a participant in the second debate and, more importantly, as an emblem of American panache….” As we can see, the noun that’s being modified (Kenneth Bone) comes right after the comma at the end of the modifier. This is correct.

Later in the sentence, though, there’s the phrase “who has sparked…sweaters.” This is a modifier too, and it is clearly referring to Mr. Bone. But the noun right before the comma here is “election,” which is wrong. This rules out Choice (A).

The other wrong answer choices fix this major mistake but create new ones. Choice (B) creates the phrase “…a number of topics that include environmental policy…,” which is a confusing way to say a group includes something. Choice (C) fixes the mistake in Choice (B) and doesn’t create any new ones, so could be correct. Choices (D) and (E) create the phrase “…as an emblem of American panache, arguably the most popular public figure in the 2016 presidential election is….” This is extremely confusing and also breaks the same modifier rule that Choice (A) does, just in a different place.

The correct answer is Choice (C).

Narrow Your Focus for GMAT Sentence Correction Success

Dominate GMAT Verbal with this Top SC Strategy

Today’s post comes from Brett Ethridge, founder of Dominate the GMAT. He has been teaching prospective business and graduate school students how to dominate the GMAT and GRE for over a decade. He’s a member of the Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC) and has a passion for empowering students to pursue their dreams through education.
 

I have some good news and some bad new for you.

First, the good news.

The good news is that when it comes to boosting your GMAT verbal score, the fastest improvements for most students come on Sentence Correction questions. The GMAT likes to test a handful of very specific points of English grammar, and they are all learnable — even for non-native English speakers.

Now for the bad news.

The bad news is that even though the grammar rules tested on the GMAT are themselves pretty basic and obvious in isolation, the test makers like to mask them in long, convoluted sentences that make them significantly harder to spot.

But more good news for you: I have a great strategy that will simplify the process of solving GMAT Sentence Correction questions and help you wade through the noise and get more right answers more efficiently. Are you ready?

GMAT Camouflage

When preparing for GMAT sentence corrections, you should spend most of your time learning the core rules for the following six points of English grammar:

  • Subject-verb agreement
  • Pronouns
  • Modifiers
  • Parallelism
  • Idioms
  • Verb tenses

For example, there’s a simple grammar rule pertaining to subject-verb agreement that says singular subjects must use singular verbs, while plural subjects must have plural verbs.

You would say Tom likes the movie because the singular subject Tom is paired with the singular verb likes.

Likewise, you would say The students study for the GMAT. The students is plural as is the verb study.

Pretty basic, right? Really it just comes down to proper verb conjugation, which most people know innately.

Of course it’s never quite that simple on the GMAT. One way the GMAT test makers could make a sentence more challenging would be to use an indefinite pronoun, such as everyone, as the subject of the sentence.

Now you’re smart and studied your grammar rules (or took my online GMAT Sentence Correction Course) so you know that everyone is always singular (as is everybody, anyone, anybody, etc.). Thus, as the subject of the sentence, everyone would require a singular verb, too. You would say Everyone is going to the movie instead of Everyone are going to the movie, for example.

But here’s where it gets tricky.

Often the GMAT likes to separate the main subject and verb of the sentence as far as possible by modifying phrases, dependent clauses, or other distractors. Then, when you’re reading the sentence and finally do get to the verb, it may “sound” right even if it’s not. What’s worse, you may not even be able to figure out what the subject of the sentence is in the first place!

For example, consider this sentence:

Everyone on both sides except the pitcher and me WAS/WERE injured in the game.

Which verb conjugation is correct, was or were? I’ll answer that in a minute, but first here’s a key strategy for you that will help you on a large number of GMAT sentence correction questions.

The Bracketing Technique

When the GMAT throws long, convoluted sentences at you making it difficult to figure out what’s going on, the key strategy is to narrow your focus and create a simpler version of the sentence that only includes the key parts of the sentence that you want to focus on.

In other words, you want to isolate only the parts of the sentence you want to test. I call it the “bracketing technique” and it’s particularly helpful for figuring out subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and idioms.

This video explains the strategy in more detail including a step-by-step illustration of how to employ it:

Pretty cool, huh? Can you see how helpful this will be for you on test day?

Think back to our earlier example: Everyone on both sides except the pitcher and me WAS/WERE injured in the game.

Following the bracketing technique, you can bracket out all of the parenthetical information in the sentence and boil it down to the following:

Everyone WAS/WERE injured.

Now it should be obvious that we need the singular verb was to go with the singular subject everyone. Well done if you figured that out!

(Note: A common mistake would be to think that the pitcher and me is the subject of the sentence, and thus go with the plural verb form were. But remember that the object of a preposition can never be the subject of the sentence, so that’s how you know that the subject must be everyone. And by the way the pronoun me is used correctly, but that’s a lesson for another article….)

Application Example

So there you have it! If you learn and practice the bracketing technique, I’m confident that it will help you get more right answers on test day.

Now it’s your turn. Give the following question from the Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017 (p.703, #771) a try and post your answer in the comments area below. (Hint: The bracketing technique will help you check subject-verb agreement). Good luck!

The absence from business and financial records of the nineteenth century of statistics about women leave us with no record of the jobs that were performed by women and how they survived economically.

(A) from business and financial records of the nineteenth century of statistics about women leave us with no record of the jobs that were performed by women and

(B) from business and financial records of statistics about women from the nineteenth century leave us with no record of what jobs women performed or

(C) of statistics for women from business and financial records in the nineteenth century leaves us with no record of either the jobs that women were performing and of

(D) of statistics on women from business and financial records in the nineteenth century leave us with no record of the jobs that women performed or of

(E) of statistics about women from business and financial records of the nineteenth century leaves us with no record of either what jobs women performed or

Top 3 ACT English Tips from an Expert Tutor

Today’s post comes from Jerusha, a professional ACT and SAT tutor, as well as a high school teacher. Jerusha writes test prep advice on her blog prepACTSAT.com. She’s joining us as a guest blogger, so look out for more posts from her in the future!

One of the best ways to study for the ACT and the SAT is to take practice tests, then go over them in detail afterwards. This is something I do a lot with my students, particularly on real tests that they’ve actually taken. You can get your old tests back via the ACT’s Test Information Release Service – it’s a great strategy to take a look at exactly which questions you got wrong and analyze them in detail. After working with a few different students on the same test, I started to notice some patterns, especially in the English section! These ACT English tips are based on the questions that many of my students got wrong, on the most recent two tests.

Since ACT English is so repetitive, and the SAT Writing and Language has very similar questions, these ACT English tips should be applicable across the both tests.

Also, I’m going to discuss the began/begun question – one of hardest questions in ACT English – so pay attention!

Dictionary macro close up.
 

ACT English Tip 1: Inserting or Deleting Information

I’m sure you already know what this question is about. It’s very common, with usually at least 3 of this type per test. Here’s an example:

1. The writer is considering deleting the underlined portion. Should the sentence be kept or deleted?

A. Kept, it reinforces the main idea of the essay.
B. Kept, it adds relevant information.
C. Deleted, because its claim is too general to be relevant to the essay
D. Deleted, as it contradicts the idea that …

 
A lot of people have a tendency to think about whether they think the sentence should be kept or deleted, and then answer that way. The problem with this approach is that the reason has to make sense as well, and only one of the reasons is actually sensible. You should make a decision about your answer based on the reason, not what you would actually do if you were editing the passage. This way, you’re turning the question from a subjective one about your opinion into an objective one about whether the reasons make sense or not. It’s always better to be answering objective, right or wrong types of questions!

In this example, obviously I didn’t have an actual passage, so you won’t see those specific answer choices. However, phrases along these lines are quite common in the answer choices, so ask yourself “is the information relevant to the essay?”, “does it contradict the idea that … ” etc. This is the question you should be answering – not whether or not you think the sentence should be kept.
 

ACT English Tip 2: Modifiers

The tough thing about this question is that it’s hard to spot. Once you do, the rule is very easy to master. Here’s an example:

After cycling for 3 hours, Sabrina felt as though the road would never end.

2: Which of the following choices is NOT acceptable?
A. Sabrina had cycled for 3 hours, and felt as though the road would never end
B. After cycling for 3 hours, the road felt endless to Sabrina
C. After Sabrina had cycled for 3 hours, she felt that the road would never end.
D. The road felt endless after Sabrina had cycled on it for 3 hours.

 

Did you get it? The correct answer is B (meaning choice B is wrong). Notice how, in that sentence, there is no subject in the first clause “After cycling for 3 hours”? This means that you don’t know who or what has been cycling for 3 hours. Logic tells you it’s Sabrina, when you read the rest of the sentence. Grammar tells you otherwise! The rule is that when there’s a clause without a subject, whatever follows the comma is the subject of the clause. Choice B actually implies that the road had cycled for 3 hours! Clearly that sounds silly, but it’s what the sentence is telling you grammatically. Watch out for this, as it’s not obvious to spot!
 

ACT English Tip 3: Parallel Phrasing

This kind of question is easy to spot, but hard to answer! You’ll know because the answer choices are different forms of the same verb. Here’s an example:

Early in the morning, I opened the box, emptied the contents onto my desk, and begun to examine the detritus of my sister’s life.

A. NO CHANGE
B. began
C. beginning
D. had begun

 

The trick is to match the verb you’re being asked about with one elsewhere in the sentence. Sometimes this requires you to remove some of the extra information that’s in the sentence, but isn’t relevant (like an interrupting clause, for example). Here, the question is made harder because a lot of people get confused about the verb ‘to begin’. As a general rule, if you can’t remember which is present and past tense, test it out in your head with a different sentence.

Let’s take the answer choices one by one:

A. ‘begun’ always needs to be used with other verbs, as in ‘had begun’. It’s wrong on its own.
B. ‘began’ is past tense, like the rest of the sentence. It’s the correct choice.
C. ‘beginning’ would work if the sentence continued with a phrase like ‘beginning to examine the detritus of my sister’s life, I found…’. But it doesn’t, so it’s wrong here!
D. ‘had begun’ doesn’t match the tense of the rest of the verbs in the sentence (i.e. none of them are in the form ‘had opened’). It would work if the sentence continued ‘had begun to examine the detritus of my sister’s life when I noticed…’.

This is such a tough one – questions with the ‘to begin’ verb are always so hard. I hope this helps clear things up in your head!

 

I hope you find these ACT English tips helpful! This blog post arose out of a cue card that I was making with one of my students, the idea being that he read it right before going into the test. Sometimes this is good, especially with things like the modifiers question – it’s so tricky to spot that you might find it helpful to be thinking about it in the back of your head while you write the test.

Share your top ACT English tips in the comments below!

The 5 Best GMAT Quant Strategies on Our Blog

This week, we’re taking a look back at the best posts on our blog that will help you improve your GMAT Quant score. Check out our top 5 GMAT Quant strategies below:

1) 3 Data Sufficiency Shortcuts for Quick Points

Check out 3 shortcuts to eliminate incorrect answers on Data Sufficiency questions so you can save time and get more points.

3 Data Sufficiency Shortcuts for Quick Points

2) The 5 GMAT Math Formulas You Need to Know by Heart

Remember these 5 math formulas so you can quickly solve difficult questions on the GMAT.

The 5 GMAT math formulas you need to know by heart

3) GMAT Math Word Problems: When in Doubt, Draw it Out

Being able to visualize word problems will help you solve them more efficiently. We show you how to apply this strategy to two example problems in this blog post.

GMAT Math Word Problems: When in Doubt, Draw it Out

4) 2 Devious GMAT Math Traps and How to Avoid Them

Be aware of these two traps on the GMAT so you don’t lose easy points!

Two Devious GMAT Math Traps and How to Avoid Them

5) GMAT Math: Don’t Buy Into This Common Percent Trap

Find out how to tackle stacked percentages, a tricky trap used on the GMAT.

GMAT Math: Don’t Buy Into this Common Percent Trap